Missives

13 April

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Over the weekend I was in touch with a number of math alumni including Aditya Badrinath, David Montague, Katie Poggensee, Yichuan Wang, and Molly Wilson. Though I should know better by now, I am always amazed to learn how useful mathematics is in so many parts of the 'real world.' For example, these former Michigan students use their math skills to solve problems in quantitative analysis, data science, mechanical engineering, finance, and education. I suppose the moral is that you can do anything with a math degree.

In a similar vein today's Math Club talk, which features Departmental Chair Mel Hochster, has the tongue-in-cheek moral: 'since you don't know what kind of mathematics you may need to solve a problem in which you are interested, you should learn everything.' His talk will discuss Dissections of squares by triangles, a beautiful problem in elementary geometry with an elegant, non-geometric solution. As always, Math Club will take place in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10pm. It is open to everyone, and the pizza and pop are free.


This week there are just a few announcements to mull over while you get ready for exams:

Please plan your study time wisely and don't give into sudden impulses,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

P.S. Thanks to Molly Wilson's friend Anna, we now have a Math T-shirt photo from Antarctica! This means we now have all seven (or eight) continents represented in our Math T-shirt photo collection.

 

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

All postings are placed in the missive due to their potential interest to students of mathematics. This does not imply endorsement of the particular program, opportunity or employer described. 

 



Legendary Missives

6 April

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Coloring and mathematics have a long history: from the doodles of Francis Guthrie that spawned the four color theorem to the computer generated images that help visualize complicated objects to 'grown up' coloring books that explore modern mathematics. Coloring can also be used to prove things, and at today's Math Club talk David Speyer will provide a beautiful demonstration of this use of coloring when he explores The fundamental theorem of algebra, Bezout's theorem, and coloring surfaces. As always, Math Club will take place in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10pm. It is open to everyone, and the pizza and pop are free.

Be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. that have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • If you have done a mathematics research project in the past year and would like to share the results with your friends and professors, the Laboratory of Geometry at Michigan invites you to submit a poster for the Undergraduate Research Poster Session. Selected submissions will be printed out (and yours to keep) and featured at the poster session on the last Tuesday of classes. In addition, taking part in the session will allow you to apply for funding to travel to the Geometry Labs United conference, to be held in Seattle in mid-August. Deadline for PDF poster submission: Tuesday, April 11. Submissions or questions: email us at logm-info@umich.edu.
  • I have heard nothing but good things about 826michigan from math people who decided to intern there. If you are a creative, hardworking individual then consider applying for an (unpaid) internship with 826michigan.
  • Graduating in Fall 2016, Winter 2016, or Spring/Summer 2017? All graduating Math Majors & Minors are invited to attend the Department of Mathematics Commencement Reception from 4:30-6:00 on Friday, April 28. Please RSVP by April 7 if you intend to come.
  • Here is some information to consider as you decide what courses to take next fall. In Fall 2017, Math 351 (Principles of Analysis) and Math 490 (Introduction to Topology) will both be taught in an inquiry-based manner. This means that you will be guided, individually and in groups, to rediscover the basic principles of analysis and topology. The instructors may occasionally lecture, but the majority of the material will be presented by students in the courses. There will be no text for either course, and in fact, it is preferred that you not use any supplemental texts. The material of the courses will be developed through handouts and worksheets.
    • Math 351 covers the basic material of real analysis, including sequences, continuity, differentiability, and integration. The course is focused on developing your facility to write your own rigorous proofs and to critique the proofs of others. Math 217 or previous exposure to a course which contains an introduction to proof is a prerequisite.
    • Math 490 generalizes important concepts like continuity and compactness from the setting of real analysis into the more general settings of metric spaces and topological spaces. The prerequisite is Math 351, Math 451, or previous exposure to the material of real analysis.
  • Be sure to take part in Michigan's UMAY 2017 survey. The 20 minutes you spend completing the survey will help improve the undergraduate experience at Michigan. Also, the response rates for this survey have been truly awful -- this means that if you participate, your voice will be greatly amplified.

CAREERS.

  • Graduating soon? Interested in the social sciences? Want to get paid to go to school? Then check this out: The University of Chicago is pioneering a new MA program in Computational Social Science where you will learn how to devise innovative formal, statistical, and computational models to make important contributions across the social sciences. The goal of the program is to train students for elite-level PhD admission in Sociology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, History, and Anthropology. Please don’t hesitate to contact Chad Cyrenne with any questions you may have.
  • Interested in a career in education? The Education Job Fair is today from 9:00 to 1:00 in the Michigan Union. The organizers expect over 100 schools to be at the Fair, and there is no need to pre-register.

Coloring is a good way to pass the time,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive


All postings are placed in the missive due to their potential interest to students of mathematics. This does not imply endorsement of the particular program, opportunity or employer described. 

 

 

30 March

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Dots have a rich tradition in mathematics. There are classic dot problems, dots that explain the world, dots that solve vexing logistical problems, etc. Dots can also be used to calculate the area of polygons in 2 dimensions, and just as with last week's talk, this idea can be extended into higher dimensions with mind bending results. To learn more, be sure to attend Jack Jeffries' 4pm Math Club talk on Counting Dots. As always, Math Club will take place in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10pm. It is open to everyone, and the pizza and pop are free.

Be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. that have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

  • We have very few Math T-shirt photos from South Campus. Here is an opportunity to fix this and make some good money. The Academic Success Program is hiring tutors for the 2017/2018 academic year. They are looking for professional and personable people who can explain mathematical concepts in a variety of methods to a diverse group of learners. They need tutors for MATH 105, 115, 116, 214, 215, 216, and 217. More information can be found here. If you're interested, apply here, and then email a copy of your resume and unofficial transcript to Kevin Lubrano.

SUMMER.

  • UM Dearborn has been funded for an REU in mathematical analysis and applications. The program will start on May 22 and end on July 14. Student participants will receive a stipend of $4,000, housing and meal allowance, and travel funding to present at conferences. Apply here.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CAREERS.

  • The LSA Summer Mentorship Program connects current LSA students with young alumni mentors, giving you the unique opportunity to learn from people who were recently student themselves. Students in the program are paired with mentors in the cities where they are working or interning over the summer, and LSA facilitates three meetings to discuss navigating life after college and making the most of your internship. In addition to location, students and mentors are also paired based on career goals, areas of study, extracurricular activities on campus and what they are hoping to get out of the program. You do not have to have your summer plans confirmed yet to APPLY by April 7 at 5PM. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to email Joe Murray.

Dots and philosophy about math education,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive


All postings are placed in the missive due to their potential interest to students of mathematics. This does not imply endorsement of the particular program, opportunity or employer described. 

 

 

 

23 March

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Physicists now think we may live in a universe with 10, 11, 26, ?? dimensions. If you are like me, then imagining what this means hurts your brain a bit. When that happens, I like to return to Carl Sagan's soothing and classic video on 4 dimensions.

Even if we can't visualize more than three spacial dimensions, as mathematicians we enjoy thinking about how life might work beyond three dimensions. We ask and answer questions like what's the volume of a ball in n-dimensions? what's the analogue of regular polygons in higher dimensions, and how many are there? how would a balloon in 41 dimensions work?

The latter questions has a rather unexpected and weird answer. To learn what it is and more about geometry in higher dimensions, please attend Beatrice-Helen Vritsiou's 4pm Math Club talk titled Where has all the air in my basketball gone? Odd phenomena from high-dimensional geometry. As always, Math Club will take place in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10pm. It is open to everyone, and the pizza and pop are free.

Be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. that have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

SUMMER.

 

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • Want to brush up on your math skills by serving as a grader? Then visit the Spring/Summer 2017 Math Grader Application web page before April 15.
  • Next Fall Math 531, Transformation Groups in Geometry, will run from MWF 9:00am10:00am. This is now a course for undergraduates that will explore groups, their basic structures, and how their properties and actions on spaces
    can be used to describe precisely and explain symmetry phenomenon in geometry. As an elementary example, the course will explain why there are only exactly 5 Platonic solids, and how these regular solids are related.
  • The Margaret S. Huntington Award in Actuarial Outreach is awarded by the Michigan Mathematics Department to select first and second year students who received an A- or better in one of the courses 115, 116, 156, 176, 185, 215, 285, or 295 during their first semester. Apply here by March 31
  • Reminder: the annual UM Undergraduate Mathematics Competition will take place Saturday, April 8th from 1 to 4PM in B844 East Hall. Sign up in the Undergraduate Office (2084 East Hall).
  • Inspired by Polymath projects, collaborative on-line math projects instigated by prominent mathematicians such as Tim Gowers and Terence Tao, CrowdMath is inviting undergraduates to participate along with high school students in an on-line collaboration to solve open problems in mathematics. Check out the current problems here.

CAREERS.

  • Are you considering graduate school in industrial engineering, operations research, or analytics as an option after graduation? IINFORMS and IISE are partnering up to bring you a panel of faculty, graduate students, and industry partners to tell you what the grad school application process is like, how graduate programs different from undergraduate programs, the job opportunities with a Master's vs. a Ph.D., and any other topics you may be thinking about. If you are interested in attending the March 29th event from 6 to 7pm in EECS 1500, then please RSVP ASAP.
  • TNTP Teaching Fellows is looking for top talent from all fields to join their next cohort of Fellows. They have had several Fellows from University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. If interested, apply ASAP.

More video of the amazing Carl Sagan,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

 

 

16 March

Dear Students of Mathematics,

This Friday the Mathematics Department will host its very first Virtual Career Panel at 4PM in the Nesbitt Room (2nd floor of the math side of East Hall), and there's a heck of an impressive line-up of guests:

There is still room for a few more students to attend, so get the heck to this page to RSVP if you plan to attend. Awesome fact: panelist Huey Fang Lim designed the math t-shirt. Which reminds me, where the heck are your photos for the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? page?

Speaking of heck, Lalit Jain will discuss some work of Eduard Helly at today's 4pm Math Club. His talk, Helly's Theorem: Dabbling with Discrete Geometry, will take place in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10pm. It is open to everyone, and, as always, the pizza and pop are free.

Be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. that have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

  • Northwestern has a pretty campus, perfect for Math T-shirt photos. Lucky you: The annual Chicago Area SIAM Student Conference (CASSC) will be hosted at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL on Saturday, April 15th. Along with plenary speakers in applied math and computational research, the conference will feature talks from graduate students and accomplished undergraduate students. Additionally, there will be an end of the day reception that provides opportunities to network with fellow students and speakers. Register here.

SUMMER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CAREERS.

  • Are you graduating this May? Are you interested in making a difference in the world? Then think seriously about applying to the Chicago Teaching Fellows program. Applications are considered on a rolling basis, so apply early.
  • Interested in a career in education? The Education Job Fair will happen on April 6 from 9:00am to 1:00pm in the Michigan Union. The organizers expect over 100 schools to be at the Fair
  • The Hire Big 10+ Virtual Career Fair will take place April 12. Registration is required.

A less desirable profession for mathematicians,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

9 March

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Next Tuesday is Pi Day (March 14). How will you celebrate? Danica McKellar has some ideas, including ballet . Or maybe you'd like to sing a classic Irving Kaplansky song? Or perhaps you'd like to show off your athleticism at the Pi Day Run out by Dexter? However you choose to celebrate, please be rational.

Pi shows up in lots of places -- Cauchy's integral formula, Coulomb's Law, the Poisson equation for gravity, Sterling's approximation formula, the Riemann zeta function, etc. It is probably most familiar to you because of its importance to the humble ellipse. Ellipses also show up in one of the most marvelous results you are ever likely to encounter. Rather than give it away, I encourage you to learn about this result by attending Beth Wolf's Math Club talk on Ellipses, Polynomials, and a Most Marvelous Theorem. Her talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

Special announcement: This weekend (as in Friday and Saturday) the department is hosting a Mathematics Symposium of faculty talks for prospective graduate students. These talks are specifically geared towards undergraduates and all math majors are strongly encouraged to attend. So, if you want to learn what some of us are up to, be sure to attend any of the talks that may interest you.

Be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. that have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

 

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

  • Northwestern has a pretty campus, perfect for Math T-shirt photos. Lucky you: The annual Chicago Area SIAM Student Conference (CASSC) will be hosted at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL on Saturday, April 15th. Along with plenary speakers in applied math and computational research, the conference will feature talks from graduate students and accomplished undergraduate students. Additionally, there will be an end of the day reception that provides opportunities to network with fellow students and speakers. Register here.
  • We still have no math T-shirt photos from the Sweetland Writing Center. What could be more fantastic than the one-two combination of excellent math skills and excellent writing skills? The Sweetland Writing Center's Minor in Writing provides the perfect vehicle for obtaining the latter. Applications are due at noon on March 13.

SUMMER.

  • Moon Duchin, former Michigan Math faculty member and now at Tufts, is running a summer research cluster on polygonal billiards. She really wants undergraduates to be involved, so check out the program to see if you might be a good fit for you. No residency restrictions.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CAREERS.

  • Curious about where you can find math people after graduation? Please join us for the first ever Mathematics Virtual Panel on March 17, 2017 at 4PM in the Nesbitt Room. You will have an opportunity to speak with UM mathematics alumni about the transition from being an undergraduate student to a variety of career paths. Alum from Wallstreet, Facebook, AIG, graduate school, and other fancy places will all be present virtually to answer your questions. RSVP if you plan to attend.
  • The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is looking to recruit Research Analysts to work closely with the economists in our Research group starting in summer 2017.
  • Sophomore women: the D. E. Shaw Discovery Fellowship 2017 will be taking place in New York City from May 23 to 25. Participants will have the opportunity to apply their analytical skills in discussions with investment professionals, attend lectures given by senior leaders and outside speakers, and interact with a cross-section of D.E. Shaw's employees. Participants will receive a $1,500 stipend, accommodations, and travel to and from New York City.  Apply by March 17.

Be sure to submit photos chronicling your winter break travels for the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? page.

A great scene from a great film,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

23 February

Dear Students of Mathematics,

The use of light and mirrors to find hidden treasure, to fight off the dark (see also this article), or to unlock the next level is well understood and often oversold. How about using light and mirrors to illustrate mathematical ideas? This is exactly the question that Brad Rodgers will take up at today's Math Club, so be sure to stop by the Undergraduate Commons at 4pm for a discussion of Reflected rays of light and Kronecker's theorem. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

Winter break presents a perfect opportunity to use light and mirrors to create a photo for the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? page. I look forward to your contributions.

Enjoy your break,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

P.S. A heads-up:

Curious about where you can find math people after graduation? Please join us for the first ever Mathematics Virtual Panel on March 17, 2017 at 4PM in the Nesbitt Room. You will have an opportunity to speak with UM mathematics alumni about the transition from being an undergraduate student to a variety of career paths. Alum from Facebook, AIG, graduate school, and other fancy places will all be present virtually to answer your questions. RSVP by Wednesday, March 8 if you plan to attend.

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

16 February

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Last week the world lost Hans Rosling. Among other things, he was a pioneer in the area of data visualization, and he became something of a rock star thanks to his BBC show The Joy of Stats. To learn more about his work, particularly in the area of revealing people's ignorance about the world, visit the Gapfinder web-page. (I did not know that the average life expectancy of the human population is now at 70; when did that happen?)

I do not have a nice segue this time, sorry. Today's Math Club takes up the question of how to fairly divide resources among competing parties -- is it even possible? To find out, please attend Shira Zerbib's 4pm discussion of Rental Harmony. Her talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

Be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. that have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

SUMMER.

  • The Edge Program invites women who will be attending math graduate school in the fall to join them in sunny California for the month of June. The goal of the program is to strengthen the ability of women students to successfully complete graduate programs in the mathematical sciences, with particular emphasis on women from underrepresented groups. Applications are due March 3.
  • Interested in earning $4,150 this summer? The Newnan Advising Center is hiring Academic Peer Advisors for Summer Orientation. Applications are due on February 24.

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • Volunteers needed! Come volunteer on April 1st (no joke!) and help run a fun math tournament for high schoolers, hosted at our very own East Hall. Lunch will be provided! Sign up here for the times that work for you. If you have any questions, please contact your fellow students Amanda Burcroff or Tali Khain.
  • The Golden Apple Award honors those teachers who consistently teach each lecture as if there was a risk of dying before the next and "strive not only to disseminate knowledge but to inspire and engage students in its pursuit." If you know such an instructor, be sure to nominate her/him. The deadline is February 25th.
  • FEMMES is hosting an exciting Science Night at Carpenter Elementary School in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Tuesday, February 21st, from 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm.  They would love for you to volunteer! At this event, volunteers will lead groups of elementary students through simple, fun science activities. This is a great hands-on experience. Visit their web-page for more information.
  • Every year the Mathematics Department nominates undergraduate students for various internal and external prizes including the Goldstein Prizes, the Frank and Brennie Morgan Prize for Outstanding Research by an Undergraduate Student, the Wirt and Mary Cornwell Prize, and the Alice T. Schafer Mathematics Prize. If you are a sophomore, junior, or senior, have a GPA of 3.9 or above, and would like to be considered for these prizes, then please submit a CV and a list of math/science references to the undergraduate office (2084 East Hall). Soon.
  • In related news, the University has created the Office of National Scholarships and Fellowships to recruit, prepare, and nominate students for the major national scholarships such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Gates Cambridge, Truman, Churchill, Goldwater, and many more. If you are interested in any of these opportunities, please make an appointment.

CAREERS.

  • Sophomore women: the D. E. Shaw Discovery Fellowship 2017 will be taking place in New York City from May 23 to 25. Participants will have the opportunity to apply their analytical skills in discussions with investment professionals, attend lectures given by senior leaders and outside speakers, and interact with a cross-section of D.E. Shaw's employees. Participants will receive a $1,500 stipend, accommodations, and travel to and from New York City.  Apply by March 17.
  • The Lenawee County Community Mental Health Authority is looking for someone to learn the ropes of the Community Mental Health (CMH) system and do analyses with Excel.  They were initially looking for someone with clinical experience AND analytics experience but Michigander Jessica Sahutoglu suggested that a math student would have the smarts to learn anything!  The candidate just needs to be really handy with Excel and ready to learn. Those who are interested should send a resume and cover letter to DebiAndrews@LCMHA.org .
  • Are you graduating this year and would you like to pursue a career in business? The Ross School of Business is accepting applications for its ten-month Master of Management degree program. There will be information sessions about the program at Ross tonight and March 6. Find out more and register for the information sessions here.
  • AIESEC has many wonderful math T-shirt photo opportunities. Through AIESEC you can find internships in financial mathematics, business analysis, education, and many others fields in over 100 countries.

Another approach to dividing resources fairly,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

9 February

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Valentine's Day is next Tuesday; it presents a good time to brush up on your understanding of limits, irrational numbers, low dimensional geometry, combinatorics, ... Speaking of combinatorics, today's 4PM Math Club features Trevor Hyde discussing Combinatorial Species and Generating Functions. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

There are two special presentations coming up in the week:

In addition to participating in the above events, be sure to check out the many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. have been posted at Math Missive Central. Here are some new items to ponder:

SUMMER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CAREERS.

T-SHIRT PHOTOS. Math T-shirt photos would be a most excellent Valentine's Day gift for me; just saying.

Math alumnus Kal Nanes (second from left) with some Valentine's inspiration,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

2 February

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Last Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the tragic Apollo 1 fire. One of the three astronauts who died in that fire was Michigan alumnus Edward White. 18 months before, in June of 1965, White and fellow Michigan alumnus James McDivitt were the crew for the Gemini 4 mission, a mission where White became the first American to walk in space. The week after McDivitt and White returned from space, Ann Arbor held a parade, the university gave them honorary doctorates in front of 30,000 people at Michigan Stadium, and the city created the McDivitt-White Plaza -- a campus space that many of you walk through on a daily basis.

As you are walking from point to point on campus, you are creating a weighted/directed graph. How much structure does this graph have? What does this question even mean? To find out, attend today's 4PM Math Club presentation by David Fernández-Bretón's on Ramsey Theory. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

Many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. have been posted at Math Missive Central; please check them out. Here are some new items to ponder:

SUMMER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CAREERS.

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

You do the math,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

26 January

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Somewhere around late middle school we learn how to solve systems of linear equations. Geometrically, it is easy to see that if such a system has a finite nonzero number of solutions, then, in fact, it has exactly one. Suppose that instead of considering linear equations, we consider any old set of algebraic equations. It is natural to ask: if the system has a finite number of zeros, can we say anything reasonable?

Amazingly, it turns out that you can say something reasonable. Better yet, you can learn more about this topic by attending Robert Walker's discussion of The BKK Root Count on C^n at today's 4PM Math Club meeting. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

Many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. have been posted at Math Missive Central; please check them out. Here are some new items to ponder:

SUMMER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CAREERS.

  • Harvard EdLabs is hiring students graduating this year for a pre-doctoral fellowship position. The program is a good bridge between college and graduate school for students interested in economics or statistics.
  • Want to make a real difference in a young person's education? City Year trains and places young adults in high-poverty schools to serve as tutors, mentors, and role-models to help students succeed and decrease the drop-out rate. Applications for their 11-month program are due February 15.

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

Another way to solve linear equations,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive



19 January

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Sometimes math tells us when things are impossible: trisecting an angle (using only straight edge and compass), squaring the circle, constructing friends. Calculus has its share of impossibility results, and today's 4pm meeting of Math Club features Evangelos Dimou venturing into the land Impossibility theorems for elementary integration. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

There will be a special math event next week: Margot Lee Shutterly, the author of the book behind the movie Hidden Figures, will be speaking on campus next Tuesday the 24th at 4PM in Rackham Amphitheater. I enjoyed the movie very much, and I encourage you to both watch the movie and attend the lecture.

Note: Tuesday, January 24, is also the DROP/ADD and PASS/FAIL deadline.

Many opportunities for summer experiences, math T-shirt photos, careers, etc. have been posted at Math Missive Central; please check them out. Here are some new items to ponder:

SUMMER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • Next Thursday Math Circle, a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics, will have its inaugural meeting for the winter term. If you are interested in helping out, please contact Stephen DeBacker; Math Circle takes place every Thursday from 6:30 to 8pm.
  • The International Association of Black Actuaries (IABA) offers scholarships. The application is now open.
  • 2017's Peer Tutor Summit will happen  February 11, from 11a.m. to 3p.m. Topics include active learning strategies, social identity, unconscious bias, working with difficult students/sessions, cultivating student self-efficacy, and cultural competency for peer tutors.

CAREERS.

  • The Asia Business Conference Executive Board invites you to their conference this Friday and Saturday (January 20-21) at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business.  Over 20 prominent business executives and government officials will participate in 7 different panel discussions and interactive sessions. This is an opportunity to receive first-hand insights from industry experts about the challenges and opportunities across industries in Asia. Please visit their website for more details: rossabc.org.
  • The Southern Teachers Agency (STA) helps hundreds of candidates find jobs at outstanding private & independent schools throughout the mid-Atlantic and South. Private schools value candidates who have participated in a teacher certification program, but have the flexibility to hire teachers with a strong academic background in mathematics who have not taken Education courses.
  • SAGA Innovations is working to guarantee that students succeed in math by supplying individualized tutoring in public schools in Chicago and New York City, and they're hiring SAGA Fellows for the 2017-2018 school year.
  • International students: Do you plan to work in the United States after finishing your degree? If so, then be sure to attend the U.S. Job Search for International Students workshop on Friday, February 17 from 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. in the Kuenzel Room of the Michigan Union.

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

  • FEMMES is still looking for volunteers to help lead elementary school students through fun, simple science activities at the Science Night at Estabrook  Elementary School in Ypsilanti, Michigan on Monday, January 23rd, from 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm. Find out more about volunteering with FEMMES here.
  • FEMMES is also hosting events called Mentor2Youth which will take place at the Parkridge Community Center on January 26 and February 2. There are four series to this event spelling out STEM and FEMMES is the science portion.  Sign up here.
  • Now is a good time to think about study abroad opportunities for next academic year or, if you prefer to be paid for your foreign travel, consider teaching abroad.

Math making the impossible possible,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

12 January

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Welcome to 2017, a prime year. I hope you made some excellent resolutions and that one of them is: I will take a picture for the 'Where has your math t-shirt been?' web page. By the way, arches, chains, and bridges seem to make nice settings for math t-shirt photos.

Speaking of arches and chains, today's 4PM meeting of Math Club features Martin Strauss speaking on Arches and Chains. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

In the coming weeks, there are two special math events which I strongly recommend that you attend:

(*) Monday we celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. The University hosts many outstanding events throughout the day, and I encourage you to attend many or all of them. In particular, the Mathematics Department hosts the annual Marjorie Lee Browne Colloquium. This year Professor Chelsea Walton will deliver a talk on Mathematics in the Age of Trump at 4PM Monday, January 16, in 1360 East Hall. A reception will follow.

(**) Hidden Figures is now playing in the theaters. I have not yet had a chance to see it, but I hear it is very good. The movie is based on the book of the same name by Margot Lee Shutterly; she will be speaking on campus on Tuesday the 24th at 4PM in Rackham Amphitheater.

If you've not yet dealt with the dilemma of what to do this coming summer, check out Math Missive Central and then read on for the latest announcements. Carpe Diem!

SUMMER.

CAREERS.

  • The D. E. Shaw group, a technology-driven hedge fund based in NYC, is looking to recruit students (and professors!) from Michigan. They seek applicants with excellent quantitative skills and a wide range of backgrounds and perspectives on the world. They encourage you to apply for any positions that may interest you on their website (there's no limit to how many you apply to). If you have any questions, please contact Eric Friedman.
  • The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) Summer Internship Program is looking for undergraduate math students to help DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.” Apply here by January 25.
  • The University's annual Winter Career Expo happens next Wednesday (18th) and Thursday (19th). Log into your Handshake account to see the list of organizations participating. Please make the most of the career fair.
  • The Blue Waters Student Internship Program is seeking students to participate in year-long student internship opportunities involving the application of high-performance computing to problems in science, mathematics or engineering. Applications are due February 1.
  • Math alumnus Yash Sandhu works at Delphinus Medical Technologies. Delphinus is currently looking for interns who would be interested in working on ultrasound tomography. Students would be expected to drive to Novi where the office is located, but will have the ability to work remotely for part of the time once certain skills are learned. He writes "Students would work on a multi-disciplinary problem that involves the intersection of Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics, etc. Programming experience is HIGHLY preferred. Students would more than likely start working on changing and configuring XML files and running numerical simulations which simulate the solutions of the Helmholtz equation as well as optimization problems which involve solving the “inverse problem” for acoustic parameters. They would be expected to carry out these experiments and then compile the results in a logically consistent manner. Success in this capacity would eventually lead to opportunities for solving challenging problems involved in image reconstruction and image post processing while requires extensive knowledge of mathematics, physics, and computer science. This might lead to eventual publications as well as employment within the company." If you have any questions, please contact Yash.
  • Graduating seniors and recent graduates may want to consider a job at ArborMetrix, a cutting edge Health Care Analytics company located right here in downtown Ann Arbor. See this page for more information about available positions.
  • Qualtrics would like you to take a look at their job postings. Apply if you are interested.
  • Mathematica Policy Research (MPR), a social policy and research firm looking to recruit Michigan undergraduates for multiple positions. Many Michigan Students of Mathematics have worked with MPR over the years, including Alexandra Killewald.
  • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine wants you to know about their Master's program in Biostatistics. They will be hosting a Webinar tonight (Thursday) at 8pm. Register for Webinar HERE.
  • The Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics at Rice University invites you to apply for their graduate program. Apply by January 15.

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

  • The 7th Annual Ann Arbor City Dodgeball Championship is Saturday, January 21. Register your team by Friday the 20th at 6PM.
  • FEMMES is looking for volunteers to help lead elementary school students through fun, simple science activities at the Science Night at Estabrook  Elementary School in Ypsilanti, Michigan on Monday, January 23rd, from 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm. Find out more about volunteering with FEMMES here.
  • The Weiser Center for Europe and Eurasia has summer grants available for summer research opportunities or internships in Europe and Eurasia.
  • Budapest, Hungary has many opportunities for T-shirt photos. The Budapest Semesters in Mathematics application deadline for this coming summer or for the next academic year is February 1. Apply on M-Compass.
  • Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology will host their 34th annual Undergraduate Mathematics Conference on April 21st and 22nd. The theme of the conference this year is "Exploring the Crossroads of Mathematics, Biology, and Medicine" and will feature plenary talks by Meg Ehm from GlaxoSmithKline and Mark Inlow from the American Institutes for Research. Apply by April 7.

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • The amazing Anton Lukyanenko is starting up a geometry lab here at Michigan. He is looking for 6 to 12 students to join in on the fun -- you need not know anything about geometry. Contact him directly and immediately) if you are interested.
  • The start of a new semester is a great time to join (or start) a club. Information about many mathematically oriented organizations on campus follow my signature.
  • The Global Financial Data Project is jointly run by Berkeley and UCLA. The aim of the program is to learn how to estimate the financial health of private companies.
  • Student of Mathematics Miral Tripathi would like for you to consider joining Nexecon Consulting Group. Nexecon is a student-run, not-for-profit consulting organization at the University of Michigan that serves clients ranging from local startups to Fortune 500 corporations. Interested in joining? Then apply at nexeconconsulting.com.
  • Are you studying Nahuatl (which has a vigesimal number system) or another less commonly taught modern language? You might be eligible for a Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship for the summer or for the academic year. Applications are due by January 15.
  • The deadline for the Association for Women in Mathematics annual essay contest is January 31.
  • Sophomores: the Graham Undergraduate Sustainability Scholars Program wants you! Math majors who've participated have had excellent experiences (and wonderful opportunities to travel). Math alumna Heather Price says "The Graham Scholars Program has fundamentally changed the way I view the world and my place in it. With such a wide array of perspectives, members of the Graham Scholars Program are able to engage in discussions you won't find anywhere else. The program highlight, however, has been the sustainability field experience. Traveling and exploring topics of sustainability at the same time made for a memorable and meaningful experience I'll never forget!" Apply by January 30.

Bridges are swell,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

P.S. The Math Department sponsors several student groups (see below). If you don't see what you like, then start your own. The Department is always happy to sponsor mathematically oriented undergraduate organizations.

  • MFAMS. The Michigan Financial and Mathematics Society seeks to support those who are pursuing a career that uses mathematics in the service of finance both professionally and academically. For more information, please e-mail eboard.mfams@umich.edu.
  • SAM. If applied math, insurance, or risk interests you, then consider joining the Student Actuaries at Michigan. Over 100 members (mostly actuarial science majors) benefit from the on-campus information sessions, actuarial exam subsidies, and professional networking events that SAM provides. In addition to their strengths in academic and professional development, the SAM Tree Owls frequently make IM sports finals. SAM has a Mass meeting tonight (Thursday) at 5PM in East Hall 1360. Visit their web page for more information.
  • STEM Society. STEM Society aims to expose K-12 students, especially in lower socioeconomic areas, to inquiry-based learning in the fields of science and math. They hope to disprove common stereotypes that students may have about science and math as well as to increase the students' awareness of the diverse opportunities available in these fields. In addition, STEM Society strives to provide undergraduates with an interest in teaching or sharing their passion for science and math with opportunities to do so. For more information, please contact them by e-mail at stemsocietyboard@umich.edu.
  • SUMS. The Society of Mathematics Students is an organization whose goal is to facilitate friendships and community amongst mathematics majors and those interested in mathematics.  It is also the undergraduate volunteer arm of Michigan's Math Circle, a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics. If you are interested in joining SUMS on Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 8 beginning January 26th to help with Math Circle, please contact Stephen DeBacker.
  • WIM. The Women in Mathematics club seeks to provide social and educational support for women studying mathematics and statistics. They provide opportunities to hear from female speakers in mathematics, allow members to meet others with similar academic interests, and provide peer support for classes and career options. WIM holds study nights, brings in speakers, and arranges group social events. If you have any questions, please e-mail women.in.math.board@umich.edu.

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

 

8 December

Dear Students of Mathematics,

In real estate, it's all about location, location, location. The same is true for place value. I have no memory of how place value was taught to me, and that is probably for the best (see also this and this; no wonder so many people have a bad attitude about math). This fall I decided to explore Place Value with the students in the University's Wolverine Pathways program, and at this afternoon's Math Club I will do the same with you. My talk is open to everyone, so show up today at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

You should be thinking about what place will result in the most value for you this approaching summer. Here's some information to help:

T-SHIRT PHOTOS.

  • The amazing Budapest Semester in Mathematics (BSM) is now officially recognized by the University of Michigan. This means that your BSM course work will transfer back to Michigan, and the cost of participating is not completely outlandish. So, check it out and apply by February 1 via M-Compass.
  • Here is a pretty damn amazing opportunity. Four graduating LSA seniors will be selected as Bonderman Fellows (scroll down a bit) so they can be paid to send me Math T-shirt photos from all across the globe. Information sessions will be held Monday, January 11, from 5 to 6pm in the Pond Room of the Michigan Union and on Wednesday, January 11 from 5:30 to 6:30pm in the Pond Room of the Michigan Union. If you can't make these sessions, then while school is in session, walk-in advising is available in the CGIS office every Monday at 3pm and Friday at 2pm classes are in session. The application deadline is January 30. Apply on-line on M-Compass.

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • The government wants you to go to graduate school in the sciences -- any science, not just math. Check out the NDSEG fellowship;the NDSEG deadline is December 9 (tomorrow!).
  • January 31 is the deadline for the annual essay contest run by the Associate for Women in Mathematics.
  • Math 289, Problem Solving, will run in the winter term. The one-credit hour class, under the direction of Professor Hugh Montgomery, will meet every Wednesday from 4 to 5PM. This course is excellent preparation for mathematical competitions, but it is also just good brain exercise.
  • Math 389, Explorations in Mathematics, is unlike any other math course you have ever taken; in this course you will experience first hand the joys and frustrations of creating your own mathematics. The course has a very limited number of seats, and we have no Math T-shirt photos from the basement of East Hall.

SUMMER.

CAREERS.

Good luck with your finals,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

P.S. Don't forget to complete your teacher evaluations -- you know your teachers won't be missing their opportunity to evaluate you.

 

 

1 December

Dear Students of Mathematics,

When someone says the word "surreal," I usually think Dali, or maybe Magritte. Not being sure what the word surreal might mean in the context of numbers, I did a Google search and found this beautiful Charles Barkley quote:

"It was surreal. I don't know what surreal means. But I heard someone say it once on TV, and it sounded smart. So this was surreal. "

Was the same sort of reasoning used to name surreal numbers? I don't know, but you can find out for yourself by attending today's Math Club presentation by David J. Fernández-Bretón on Surreal Numbers. His talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

Now is the time to begin to think seriously about your plans for next summer; I'll post information about summer opportunities both here and on the missive page. In the meantime, here's some information to ponder during the final weeks of the semester:

Summer:

Careers:

  • Math alumna Ruthi Hortsch (2011) reports that BEAM (see this article for an idea of how awesome BEAM is) is hiring college students for next summer. BEAM has counselor/TA positions available at both their residential and non-residential sites. Positions are filled on a rolling basis, so act now.
  • Math alumna Beatrix Balogh (2013) and co-runner of A^2 Health Hacks reports that the William Davidson Institute is now hiring a full-time research associate for a position starting this January 2017. The position would mainly involve data/statistical analysis and quantitative modeling/simulation for global health supply chains, and it is a great experience for any recent/soon-to-be graduates interested in applying their analytical skills to healthcare. See http://wdi.umich.edu/jobs/ for more information.
  • The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Mass Media Science & Engineering Fellowship seeks to increase communication skills in student scientists by placing advanced undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate science, engineering, and mathematics students at media sites nationwide to work as science reporters for ten weeks. Deadline is January 15.
  • MindSumo connects college students to companies via real world challenges for college students to solve. Students prove their skills, win cash prizes, and connect with companies that use MindSumo to actively recruit for jobs and internships. They are still anxious to include Michigan students.
  • Intern in Michigan is a free web-based system that connects employers and students to internship opportunities based on skills, interests and requirements.
  • Freshmen: On Friday from noon to 1PM the Career Center will host Freshman Friday at the Career Center. This is an excellent opportunity to meet your Career Center Advisors in an informal setting.
  • Please sign up for a Handshake account.; it is a good way to keep track of which companies are visiting campus, where to find internships, how to clean up your resume, etc.

More opportunities:

  • Sophomores: the Graham Undergraduate Sustainability Scholars Program wants you! Math majors who've participated have had excellent experiences (and wonderful opportunities to travel). Alumna Heather Price (2016) says "The Graham Scholars Program has fundamentally changed the way I view the world and my place in it. With such a wide array of perspectives, members of the Graham Scholars Program are able to engage in discussions you won't find anywhere else. The program highlight, however, has been the sustainability field experience. Traveling and exploring topics of sustainability at the same time made for a memorable and meaningful experience I'll never forget!" Apply by January 30.
  • Math 289, Problem Solving, will run in the winter term. The one-credit hour class, under the direction of Professor Hugh Montgomery, will meet every Wednesday from 4 to 5PM. This course is excellent preparation for mathematical competitions, but it is also just good brain exercise.
  • Want to brush up on your math skills by serving as a grader? Then visit the Winter 2017 Math Grader Application web page before December 31.
  • Math 389, Explorations in Mathematics, is unlike any other math course you have ever taken; in this course you will experience first hand the joys and frustrations of creating your own mathematics. The course has a very limited number of seats, and we have no Math T-shirt photos from the basement of East Hall.
  • InstaEDU, a Chegg service, is looking for tutors. Apply here. Please, please, please: make sure that you are part of the solution, and not part of the problem.

An interview with Knuth, the namer of surreal numbers,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

P.S. Don't forget to complete your teacher evaluations -- you know your teachers won't be missing their opportunity to evaluate you.

P.P.S. Certain math classes (e.g., 176, 186, 286, 296, 310, 351, 389, 396, 423, 465, 506, 512, 525, 526, 626) require that you add yourself to the waitlist instead of directly registering.   For these courses, you should review the notes in the Course Guide as there may be additional instructions on how to secure a space in the course.  The friendly people in the undergraduate office will process permissions for these courses once they have gathered the relevant enrollment data.  Patience is a virtue.

 

 

 

17 November

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Four score and seventy-three years ago this coming Saturday, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln's powerful speech justifying the sacrifices made at Gettysburg and elsewhere during the Civil War continues to speak to all of us. Lincoln was a student of math (see, for example, the fifth paragraph ("Oh, yes! ..." ) of this amazing article from 1864), and he sometimes referenced mathematics explicitly, as in the fourth Lincoln-Douglas debate:

If you have ever studied geometry, you remember that by a course of reasoning, Euclid proves that all the angles in a triangle are equal to two right angles. Euclid has shown you how to work it out. Now, if you undertake to disprove that proposition, and to show that it is erroneous, would you prove it to be false by calling Euclid a liar?

Many claim that the eloquence of Lincoln's rhetoric owed something to his mathematical training. Personally, I have always liked how Lincoln, intentionally or not, changed the axiomatic self-evident truth "that all men are created equal" found in the Declaration of Independence into the "proposition that all men are created equal" in his Gettysburg Address, thus reinforcing his point that the statement "all men are created equal" is not an axiom but rather a truth whose proof requires work and sacrifice. Food for thought in these interesting times.

The frieze of the Lincoln Memorial, which can be seen on the back of any five dollar bill, features a repeating pattern of wreathes and state names. Is there symmetry in this repeating pattern? Can we classify all of the possible symmetries? Professor Eleonore Faber will tackle these questions when she discusses Diamonds and Diagonals: frieze patterns at today's 4PM Math Club talk. Her talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza and pop are free.

I still have no Math T-shirt Photos from Gettysburg. If you don't have time to travel there over Thanksgiving Break, then here are some other Math T-shirt photo opportunities to consider as you give thanks:

Opportunities:

  • Jazz drummer. I really, really, really need a drummer (I have a drum kit!) for the department holiday party for instructors and staff. Please e-mail me directly if you are a drummer and are available Wednesday December 14 from noon to 4.
  • We still have no Math T-shirt photos of people giving blood in the annual Michigan-Ohio State Blood Battle. It looks like Michigan has retaken the lead, but the Blood Battle does not end until next Wednesday (the 23rd). So get out there and support your school.
  • Math 389, Explorations in Mathematics, is unlike any other math course you have ever taken; in this course you will experience first hand the joys and frustrations of creating your own mathematics. The course has a very limited number of seats, and we have no Math T-shirt photos from the basement of East Hall.

Summer:

  • Park City is hosting an undergraduate summer school on the topic of Random Matrices. Apply here by February 1.
  • The Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM) at UCLA runs the Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) program for students, including international students, in math and related disciplines who wish to work in teams on real world research projects proposed by a sponsor from industry or a national lab. The deadline for applications is Valentine's Day, 2017.
  • The Department of Homeland Security sponsors a 10-week summer internship program for students majoring in homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.  The program provides students with quality research experiences at federal research facilities located across the country and allows students the opportunity to establish connections with DHS professionals. Applications are due December 7.
  • The University of Minnesota - Twin Cities wants you to join their REU in astronomy and physics. Details are here.

Careers:

  • Math alumnus Joshua Zeldin (2015) reports that the financial consulting company for which he works, First Derivatives, is looking to hire several new graduates. He reports that the Data Science and Software Engineering tracks are perfect for mathematics students who are interested in gaining experience in the world of big data and software development and the Financial Engineering track is perfect for students interested in entering finance. In addition to roles as consultants, we are also hiring several graduates in a new Business Development track. If you have any questions, please contact Joshua directly (or at this e-mail).
  • Roshni Verma, a corporate headhunter, is looking for a December 2016 grad (or earlier) to fulfill a data scientist position in Detroit.
  • Interested in pursuing math and staying in the greater Detroit area? The amazing Dan Isaksen from Wayne State University invites you to consider their PhD program in mathematics.
  • Cornell's ORIE Master of Engineering program likes Michigan students. If you are interested in using your math to explore Applied Operations Research, Data Analytics, Financial Engineering, Information Technology, Strategic Operations, Systems Engineering, and Manufacturing, then be sure to check their program out . We have no Math T-shirt photos from Cornell.

Here is some advice to help you avoid being frozen out of your classes for next term: certain math classes (e.g., 176, 186, 286, 296, 310, 351, 389, 396, 423, 506, 512, 525, 526, 626) require that you add yourself to the waitlist instead of directly registering.   For these courses, you should review the notes in the Course Guide as there may be additional instructions on how to secure a space in the course.  The friendly people in the undergraduate office will process permissions for these courses once they have gathered the relevant enrollment data.  Patience is greatly appreciated.

Lincoln on Euclid,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

 

10 November

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Solitons are very cool mathematical objects that make for awesome videos like these: one, two, and maybe, but not really, three (even cooler in this version). To learn about the mathematics and history of Solitons please attend today's Math Club presentation by Deniz Bilman. As always, everyone is invited, the pizza and pop are free, and it all happens today at 4PM in the Nesbitt room.

Here are some of the opportunities that have passed through my in-box this week:

Opportunities:

  • The Third International Students' Olympiad in Cryptography NSUCRYPTO'2016 will consist of two independent Internet rounds:
      • the first round will be held on November 13, 2016;
      • the second round will be held during November 14 - November 21, 2016.
    Its aim is to involve young researchers in solving curious and tough scientific problems of modern cryptography. Register soon.
  • If you are really creative, and I know you are, you could work a Math T-shirt photo into you entry for LSA's Science As Art Contest
    Submission deadline is January 20, 2017.
  • Are you looking for a major/minor to complement you math studies? Lucky you! LSA's next Major/Minor Meet-up will take place in the Gallery of the Hatcher Graduate Library next Monday from 2:30 to 4:30. We have no Math T-shirt photos from the Gallery.
  • Math 389, Explorations in Mathematics, is unlike any other math course you have ever taken; in this course you will experience first hand the joys and frustrations of creating your own mathematics. The course has a very limited number of seats, so add yourself to the wait list.

Careers:

  • Given the number of interesting monuments there, we have very few Math T-shirt photos from the nation's capitol. Here is a chance to help the T-shirt cause: The Washington Center has formed partnerships with a number of federal agencies in order to provide competitive government internship opportunities. Apply now.
  • The graduate program in Mathematical, Computational and Systems Biology (MCSB) at UC Irvine is looking for excellent students, with a variety of different backgrounds, who wish to work at the interface between the biological sciences, the physical sciences, computer sciences and engineering. Check out their brochure.

T-shirt Photos:

Summer:

Plotting solitions,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

 

3 November

Dear Students of Mathematics,

What will be your racket, your grind, your bacon exchange? Perhaps actuarial work is your calling, or, like Milton Northey Haskins (the actuary with Nutmeg Insurance), your fear of misplaced decimal points has you looking to broaden your career horizons. Maybe a career in Magic? Rock? Astrophysics? Social activism? University President (again, again, again, again, ...)? Computer science? Music composition? Art? Geology? Politics? Architecture? Business? Music criticism? Economics? Soccer? Boxing? History? Math Artisan? History of Science? a religious vocation? drummer? forensic accountant? baseball (again, and again)? To explore the many career options available to students of mathematics, I strongly encourage you to attend the Math Department's Career Conference tomorrow (Friday) afternoon (from 1 to 4). Besides learning about possible careers, you can also purchase a classic math T-shirt for $5 (that's cheaper than clothing!); take advantage of drop-in math advising; and attend the WIM Career panel discussion from 3:30 to 4:15 in the Nesbitt Room (located at 2851 East Hall).

The career conference is an opportunity to learn about possible career paths; here are some tips on how to prepare.

Milton Northey Haskins was very rational, and he was definitely a square. This all begs the question: in modern times, Where are the Rational Squares? Find out by attending today's Math Club presentation by Michael Weiss. As always, everyone is invited, the pizza and pop are free, and it all happens today at 4PM in the Nesbitt room.

Read on:

Opportunities:

  • Jane Street is hosting an Estimathon tonight (November 3rd) at 6:30 PM in Chem A859. Students of all tenures are encouraged to attend (no finance background necessary). If you're interested in attending, please sign up here so enough pizza is ordered.
  • Math 389, Explorations in Mathematics, is unlike any other math course you have ever taken; in this course you will experience first hand the joys and frustrations of creating your own mathematics. The course has a very limited number of seats, so add yourself to the wait list early (and often).
  • Seniors: The Yenching Academy plans to draw together an interdisciplinary cohort of students to pursue a fully-funded 1-year masters program in China Studies at Peking University (the Michigan of the East of China -- listen to the full clip from the 1960 presidential campaign, fascinating). Students from all academic disciplines are eligible to apply. Courses will be conducted in English, so prior knowledge of Chinese is not required. The deadline to apply for U-M nomination is noon on the last Monday in November.
  • The National Defense Science and Technology Graduate Fellowship is another absolutely enormous fellowship that will help pay for your graduate education. The application is due December 9th.

Careers:

  • WIM will be holding a CAREER PANEL at the end of the career conference! From 3:30-4:15pm the panel will be in the Nesbitt Common Room (2851 EH) talking to Allison Kellog from AAA - The Auto Club Group, Mark Garrett from the UM School of Business, and Amber Marie Simon from Willis Towers Watson. Please join WIM for snacks and to ask any and all questions about the career process - and what you can do with a math degree!
  • Cornell's ORIE Master of Engineering program likes Michigan students. If you are interested in using your math to explore Applied Operations Research, Data Analytics, Financial Engineering, Information Technology, Strategic Operations, Systems Engineering, and Manufacturing, then be sure to check their program out . We have no Math T-shirt photos from Cornell.
  • The UofM alumni association brings you free bagels and coffee every Wednesday morning. That is pretty awesome, but they do much more for you. For example, next Friday they will hold a Face to Face with Michigan Alumni event. Need career advice? Have questions about the field you want to go into? Get face to face with alumni and have one-on-one conversations about their area of expertise.
  • Most of the world remains underrepresented on the Where Has Your Math T-shirt been? collection. The IAESTE Internship Placement Program, which matches university students majoring in STEM fields with paid internships abroad, could help change this.
  • Please sign up for a Handshake account through UofM's Career Center.; it is a good way to keep track of which companies are visiting campus, where to find internships, how to clean up your resume, etc.
  • Okemos based TechSmith is currently recruiting for a variety of entry level positions and internships and would like University of Michigan students of mathematics to apply.
  • The University of Chicago's Booth School would like for you to consider pursuing a PhD in Business there. Apply here.

T-shirt Photos:

  • We still have no Math T-shirt photos of people giving blood in the annual Michigan-Ohio State Blood Battle. The battle is now in its 35th year! I remind you that last year your team was beaten both on the gridiron (13-42) and in the blood drive (2241-2529). So, help your school out and do good.
  • Here is a pretty damn amazing opportunity, and it is sure to make me happy when you send me your Math T-shirt photos. Four graduating LSA seniors will be selected as Bonderman Fellows (scroll down a bit) so they can travel the world. An information session will be held on Friday December 2; you may also email LSABonderman@umich.edu for more information. The application deadline is January 30.

Summer:

  • Brown University is a great location for Math T-shirt pictures. The Undergraduate Summer Research Program at Brown University
    is designed for a select group of 14-16 undergraduate scholars. Applications are due February 17.
  • NASA is another excellent place to take Math T-shirt photos. To learn about the many opportunities NASA has available, visit their OSSI NIFS page and click around to discover all the available opportunities.
  • Michigan's School of Public Health will again be running its Big Data Summer Institute from June 5 to July 14 next summer. This is a 6-week mentored summer research program focused on Big Data and related computational and statistical problems. Applications will be taken beginning December 15.

Irrational talk about squares,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

P.S. From an old Economist article: "One reason why people who learn more mathematics earn more is because doing maths makes you smarter and more productive. According to Clancy Blair, a professor of psychology at NYU, the act of performing mathematical calculations improves reasoning, problem-solving skills, behaviour, and the ability to self-regulate. These skills are associated with the pre-frontal cortex part of the brain, which continues to develop into your early 30s. Solving maths problems improves the way your brain functions and, according to Mr Blair, this can translate into an ability to earn more money and form stable relationships."

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

27 October

Dear Students of Mathematics,

According to Career Cast, Mathematics continues to dominate the top ten career paths (#1 for data scientists, #2 for statisticians, #6 for general students of mathematics, #7 for software engineers, and #10 for actuarial scientists). What sort of career will you take up upon graduation? Will you be a data scientist (again, again, and again)? a software engineer (again, and again)? a statistician? a quantitative strategist? a poker player (and again)? a blackjack player? a hedge fund manager (and again)? a CFO? a sociologist? a news correspondent? a businessperson (and again)? a Pulitzer Prize winner? a White House Counsel? a composer? a lawyer? a writer/producer of television shows? a defender of civil liberties? a science fiction writer (and again)? a novelist? a writer of stories for children? a professional baseball player? a professional football player (again, and again)? a matchmaker? a computer researcher (and again, again, again, ... really, there is no shortage of such people)? a Supreme Court Justice? a romance novelist? a poet? a tennis star? an actor (and again)? a folk singer? a Secretary of Defense (and again)? a consulting guru? a Nobel Prize winning UofM honorary degree recipient? To explore the many career options available to students of mathematics, I strongly encourage you to attend the Math Department's Career Conference next Friday November 4 in the beautiful mathematics atrium. A partial list of participating companies/programs may be found on this flier, which you may wish to share/post.

It is curious that students of such a beautiful, dynamic subject find careers across such a complex range of fields. This thought reminds me that today's 4PM Math Club features Sandrine Daurat speaking on The Beauty of Complex Dynamics. Her talk is open to everyone, so show up at the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall) at 4:10 PM. As always, the pizza, math, and pop are free.

Monday is Halloween; probably not a good opportunity for you to contribute to the Math T-shirt photo collection (unless you plan to dress as me), but here are some other opportunities:

Opportunities:

  • Tomorrow is your final opportunity to order a Michigan Mathematics Mug. Orders may be placed in 2074 East Hall.
  • Sophomores: the Graham Undergraduate Sustainability Scholars Program is an interdisciplinary sustainability leadership training and development program to which students apply the second semester of their sophomore year. Core components include an interdisciplinary thinking seminar, a leadership development seminar, a hands-on Sustainability and the Campus course; and a field-based experience course. Details for each of these may be found here.
  • I may need jazz musicians for the Department's annual non-Xmas party. If you, a family member, or a friend are reasonably good at drums, keyboard, sax, trumpet, trombone, clarinet, etc. and would like to help keep 40+ years of math department tradition alive by playing in the awesome jazz band that performs at the non-Xmas party, then please e-mail me immediately.
  • Juniors and Seniors: The Elie Wiesel Foundation's Essay Contest invites you to submit a 3,000-4,000 word essay that articulates and analyzes an ethical topic of importance in your chosen field of study. The deadline for essays and faculty forms is Monday, December 19th by 5 PM PST. More information about Elie Wiesel may be found here and here.
  • Budding author? If you enjoy writing poetry, prose, novels, screen plays, etc., then you may wish to submit your work to Michigan's Hopwood Awards Program.
  • Are you a bright, innovative undergraduate? Of course you are. So, why not have your best projects and coursework recognized with an award and a trip to Dublin in 2017? Find out more by visiting The Undergraduate Awards web page.
  • If you are interested in chemistry, biology, or engineering, the UNCF/Merck Science Initiative provides undergraduate and graduate support to outstanding African-American students in these areas.

Careers:

T-shirt Photos:

  • We still have no Math T-shirt photos of people giving blood in the annual Michigan-Ohio State Blood Battle. The battle is now in its 35th year! I remind you that last year your team was beaten both on the gridiron (13-42) and in the blood drive. So, help your school out and do good.
  • Circle K is an international co-ed community service organization that focuses on its three tenets of service, leadership, and friendship. In addition to the 4 or 5 projects that Circle K hosts daily through its on-line calendar, every year they also host CIRCLE K SERVICE DAY (CKSD). This year, CKSD begins on Saturday, November 12th and ends on Sunday, November 13th. Volunteers at CKSD may participate in 1 project or more. Sounds like a good opportunity to contribute to the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? collection and do good.
  • Inspired by the spirit of Raoul Wallenberg, the Wallenberg Fellowship is awarded in the spring of each year to a graduating senior of exceptional promise and accomplishment who is committed to service and the public good. The fellowship provides $25,000 to carry out an independent project of learning or exploration anywhere in the world during the year after graduation.  Check out some of the amazing experiences that past recipients have had and get busy on your applications (which are due December 1).
  • If you might be interested in doing an internship abroad, please consider the Cultural Vistas Internships Abroad program. What an excellent opportunity to contribute to the math T-shirt picture collection.

Summer:

  • The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate Office of University Programs sponsors a 10-week summer internship program for students majoring in homeland security related science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Applications are due December 7.

Logical witch hunting,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

20 October

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Last Monday Oliver Hart and Bengt R. Holmström were awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Economics (technically, the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel). They are both students of mathematics. In fact, more than a third of the 78 recipients of the Nobel Prize in Economics have been students of mathematics (and at least one additional recipient is a lapsed student of mathematics); that's pretty amazing.

If economics is not your thing, there are a great many other career options to explore. For example: You may wish to use your mathematical training as a dean (again, again, again, again, again, ...), a statistician, a veterinarian, a juggler, an audio engineer, an author, a satirist, a professional musician, a pro-wrestler, a basketball player, or a photographer. To explore the many career options available to students of mathematics, I strongly encourage you to attend the Math Department's Career Conference. The conference will take place on the afternoon of Friday November 4 in the beautiful mathematics atrium. A partial list of participating companies/programs may be found on this flier, which you may wish to share/post.

Many people report great job satisfaction when they are working on big, important questions of life. Many of the big, important questions mathematicians think about involve primes, so you are in luck because Efrat Bank is going to address variations on the question How Many Primes are there? at today's Math Club meeting. As always, everyone is invited, the pizza and pop are free, and it all happens at 4PM in the Nesbitt Common Room on the second floor of East Hall. All are invited.

Read on in order to lead a regret free life. (This reminds me: if you are graduating in May, according to the University now is a good time to schedule an advising appointment so that you can be properly released. ) A more permanent record of the many opportunities available to you is kept at Missive Central.

Careers.

  • Math alumna Beth Nakamura would like you to consider applying for General Electric’s early career full-time rotational programs. These provide opportunities for domestic and international assignments as well as leadership, business, and technical training. Two programs that may be of particular interests to students of math are:
    • The Digital Technology Leadership Program is a two-year rotational program to develop enterprise applications that change the world. DTLPs can select assignments across data science, software engineers, and product management roles.
    • The Financial Management Program is a two-year rotational program include roles in GE’s core financial competencies: Commercial Finance & Project Financing, Supply Chain Finance, and Financial Planning & Analysis.
    Please contact Beth Nakamura, a current DTLP, with any questions.
  • Miles Kimball's research team (Dan Benjamin, Ori Heffetz and Miles Kimball) is looking to hire a full-time research assistant to start in the summer of 2017. They are looking for senior undergraduate students in the econ/math/statistics departments at Michigan. Here is a description of the position.
  • Michigan's International Opportunities Fair 2016 is a great way to connect with international organizations right here on campus. Last year more than 50 organizations offered international work, internships, and volunteer opportunities. The fair will take place Wednesday October 26 from 2 to 6 PM at the Michigan Union.
  • Teach for America (more general than Math for America, but needs math teachers) asks that I remind you that they have rolling monthly deadlines (beginning in August) that end in February.
  • Wolfram Research is seeking motivated students for its Wolfram Student Ambassador Program. This program gives exemplary students an opportunity to further their tech careers by sharing their enthusiasm for knowledge and technology on their campuses. Apply today.

Opportunities:

  • ModelOff - the Financial Modeling World Championships - is a fast, fun and free way for students to get exposure to real world case studies, develop financial modeling skills and build their CVs. The first on-line round starts October 22nd and students have free entry with the discount code STUDENTFINANCE2016. For more information and registrations, visit www.modeloff.com.
  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology announces the launch of the Sixth Annual International Undergraduate Poster Competition. You are invited to enter this competition by submitting an abstract of your original work before November 10th 2016 for presentation in the form of a poster or video. For any queries, please email: weppostersession@kaust.edu.sa
  • The Center for Education Outreach (located in the South U mall, second floor) runs the program Rising Scholars, which recruits math tutors for local high schools.   The goal is to help hand picked, academically average 8th graders become stronger academically through U-M student tutoring support. U-M students volunteer at one of the area high schools once or twice per week: Huron Mon-Thurs 2:39 - 3:43; Pioneer Mon - Fri 1:43-2:39, Skyline Mon - Fri 1:30-3:30. If you are interested, the contact person at CEO is Michael Turner (mlturner@umich.edu).  
  • The Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship is open to current female undergraduate or graduate students who will be studying at a university in the United States or Canada. Deadline: December 1, 2016
  • The Generation Google Scholarship is open to current undergraduate or graduate students from an underrepresented background in computer science who will be studying at a university in United States or Canada. Deadline: December 1, 2016
  • The Google Lime Scholarship is open to current undergraduate or graduate students with disabilities who will be studying at a university in United States or Canada. Deadline: December 4, 2016
  • The Google SVA Scholarship for student veterans is open to current undergraduate or graduate student veterans who will be studying at a university in the United States. Deadline: November 4, 2016
  • Michigan's Semester in Detroit program is something I definitely would have taken advantage of as an undergraduate. Be sure to check it out.
  • The Michigan Mathematics Mug makes an excellent graduation thank you gift (for your financial backers). Orders for the next round of mugs are being taken in 2074 East Hall until Friday October 28.

Some careers are more demanding than others,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

P.S. Winners of the Nobel in Economics who were students of math: Ragnar FrischJan TinbergenJohn HicksLeonid Kantorovicch, Tjalling KoopmansMilton FriedmanGerard DebreuJohn NashWilliam VickreyRobert MertonJames HeckmanMichael SpenceDaniel KahnemanClive GrangerEdward C. PrescottRobert AumannEric MaskinRoger MyersonPeter DiamondChristopher A. SimsKenneth Arrow, Alvin E. Roth, Lloyd S. Shapley, Lars Peter Hansen, Jean Tirole, Oliver Hart and Bengt R. Holmström.

 

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

13 October

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Graduating in May? According to the University, now is a time to schedule an advising appointment so that you can be properly released (hat tip to Blythe). But then what happens to you? Ah, a career. It is probably time for all of us to spend a bit of time thinking about that, so please plan to attend the Department's wildly wonderful Career Conference on the afternoon of Friday November 4 in the beautiful mathematics atrium.

The conference provides an excellent to develop your networking skills. Speaking of networks, Feng Zhu is going to discuss Coordinating sensors using topology at today's Math Club meeting. As always, everyone is invited, the pizza and pop are free, and it all happens at 4PM in the Nesbitt Common Room on the second floor of East Hall. All are invited.

Fall Break is approaching. This will give you four uninterrupted days to sleep and as well as to take some wonderful photos for the Math T-shirt page. It will also give you some time to mull over the following opportunities:

Careers.

  • Current Student of Mathematics Kyle Finnegan is Michigan's student ambassador for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a federal agency dedicated to researching, developing, and enforcing regulations in consumer finance markets. He will be hosting an information session and application workshop tonight (Thursday October 13th) from 7 to 8pm in Room 1110 of Weill Hall (Ford School). Any interested students are welcome! The CFPB is currently recruiting for the following positions: CFPB Internship, Summer 2017 (applications go live 10/20 and should be completed within 7-14 days to be competitive); Director's Financial Analyst (application window is 10/13 - 10/17 for this prestigious rotational program); and Research Assistant (applications go live 10/20 and should be completed within 7-14 days to be competitive).

Opportunities:

  • Michigan's tea happens every weekday at 3:45 in the common area on the second floor of East Hall; if you've avoided attending because you don't own a Michigan Mathematics Mug, then lucky you: orders for the next round of mugs are being taken in 2074 East Hall until Friday October 28.

T-shirt Photos:

  • This is really a summer opportunity, but we have no Math T-shirt pictures from Lansing. MSU will host a 10-week NSF summer REU in computational and data science May 21 to July 28, 2017. Research areas include: computational chemistry, computational biology, computational physics, computational mathematics, bioinformatics, big data science, and computational electromagnetics. Applications accepted from October 1 through February 28.

Be sure to relax over break,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

6 October

Dear Students of Mathematics,

I had the world's most amazing high school math teacher: Mr. Leroy Gnad. I may not be able to remember what I ate for breakfast today, but I can recall many of the things he said during my freshman year geometry class back in Hays -- things like "The only way you'll ever get extra credit in one of my classes is by trisecting a general angle using only compass and straightedge." or "Paul, we have SAA, SAS, and SSS. As for your question about Angle-Side-Side ... there might not be one in math, but there is certainly one in this class." I also remember that when discussing parabolas he made the following remark that really caused me to think: "A parabola is a parabola. See this parabola on the board? If we drew it really big, then drove over to Schoenchen and looked at it from there, it would look exactly the same."

At this afternoon's Math Club talk you will have the opportunity to think about Mr. Gnad's remark for yourself as Trevor Hyde addresses the question "How does a parabola look on the horizon?" His talk occurs at 4:10 talk in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall). All are invited, and the food, drink, and math are free.

Below you will find more opportunities for Math Students. A more permanent record of the many opportunities available to you is kept at Missive Central.

Careers.

  • Many students of mathematics have enjoyed working in logistical support positions at TACOM in Warren, MI. Another such position will be opening soon -- please see Job Announcement Number NCBV166407301815242 that will be posted on www.usajobs.gov from11-17 October 2016 for an Operations Research Analyst (2 positions). Applicants must apply through the website to be considered.  Follow the instructions in the vacancy announcement to apply for the job.
  • Thinking about graduate school? Interested in biostatistics? UCSD wants you to apply to their PhD program in biostats.
  • Freshmen: Every Friday from noon to 1PM the Career Center hosts Freshman Friday at the Career Center. This is an excellent opportunity to meet your Career Center Advisors in an informal setting.
  • Eventually, the fun, halcyon college days come to an end for most of us. It is never too early to prepare for life after college. If you are going to ask a teacher for a letter of recommendation, please try to do it while the teacher has a chance of remembering not only who you are, but also how you performed in the class. Waiting until two or three years after the class is not a good option. Also, for the relatively low price of twenty-five dollars, the Career Center offers a Reference Letter Service. This service may also be used to streamline the graduate school (professional or otherwise) application process.

Opportunities:

  • Tired of solving other peoples' math problems and want to create some of your own? Consider becoming an MMATHS problem writer! MMATHS is a new high school math competition which will be hosted at UofM this April. It is a great STEM outreach opportunity and a fun way to use your math skills! If you are interested, please contact Amanda Burcroff or Tali Khain for more information.
  • Michigan's tea happens every weekday at 3:45 in the common area on the second floor of East Hall; if you've avoided attending because you don't own a Michigan Mathematics Mug, then lucky you: orders for the next round of mugs are being taken in 2074 East Hall until Friday October 28.
  • Students of Mathematics have a very impressive track record when it comes to winning the Goldwater, Astronaut, and Churchill Scholarships. (If you are not impressed by the list, remember: Michigan has had only 14 Churchill's in its history and about 8 Astronaut Scholars.) If you have both a GPA above 3.9 and research experience, then you should seriously consider representing Michigan in these national competitions. If you are interested, please contact me pronto.
  • The National Science Foundation has huge, absolutely enormous, graduate fellowships for seniors planning to continue on to graduate school (in many disciplines). Here's how to win one. Apply today -- deadlines fall in October, that is very soon.

T-shirt Photos:

  • The Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics is now taking applications for their 2017 conference -- you have until October 11th. We have no math t-shirt photos from Nebraska.
  • FEMMES is hosting a Community Outreach Event at the Ann Arbor District Library Mallett's Creek branch on October 15, 2016 from 10AM-12PM; we have no math t-shirt photos from any Ann Arbor public library. At this event, volunteers will lead groups of elementary students through simple, fun science activities. If you decide to volunteer, FEMMES will send you an instructor guide prior to the event so that you are well-prepared to lead your activity. FEMMES will also organize carpools for those without transportation. Sign up here before Friday the 7th.

Using parabolas to defend oneself,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

 

29 September

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Yesterday Jeff Weeks gave an awesome public lecture on the shape of space. In what promises to be an excellent encore, be sure to check out today's Math Club talk where Professor Weeks will discuss Visualizing Four Dimensions. His talk occurs at 4:10 talk in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall). All are invited, and the food, drink, and math are free.

Below you will find more opportunities for Math Students. A more permanent record of the many opportunities available to you is kept at Missive Central.

Careers.

  • Michigan's Fall Career Expo continues today, Thursday, September 29, from 10:30 to 3:30 pm in the Michigan Union.
  • The SAGA Fellows program will be at the Career Expo; they are looking for people who want to make a meaningful impact on the world.
  • Current Juniors: Michigan Math alumna Carmen Lee currently works as a trader for BNP Paribas in New York and would like for you to know that BNP Paribas will be on campus Friday, October 7th for a presentation and networking session 2-3:30pm at the Ross School of Business (R1240). Math majors are encouraged to attend.
  • Whether you are a first year or an nth year, y'all need to set up a Handshake account. Do it right now. This is one way to figure out which end is up before you leave the cocoon we call college.
  • The Institute for Broadening Participation is a National Science Foundation/National Security Association funded group that serves as a clearing house for information on education and career training activities in the STEM disciplines. To search through their vast listings, please visit www.pathwaystoscience.org.
  • Freshmen: Every Friday from noon to 1PM the Career Center hosts Freshman Friday at the Career Center. This is an excellent opportunity to meet your Career Center Advisors in an informal setting.
  • Eventually, the fun, halcyon college days come to an end for most of us. It is never too early to prepare for life after college. If you are going to ask a teacher for a letter of recommendation, please try to do it while the teacher has a chance of remembering not only who you are, but also how you performed in the class. Waiting until two or three years after the class is not a good option. Also, for the relatively low price of twenty-five dollars, the Career Center offers a Reference Letter Service. This service may also be used to streamline the graduate school (professional or otherwise) application process.

Opportunities:

T-shirt Photos:

  • We still have no Math T-shirt pictures from the extremely popular Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics. Applications for the 2017 Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics will be taken on-line between October 4 and October 11, 2016. (By the way, Michigan Math alumna Judy Walker founded this conference 19 years ago.)
  • Michigan Math (grad) alumnus Kevin Tucker is co-hosting the Undergraduate Mathematics Symposium at the University of Illinois, Chicago on Saturday, October 15. Bonus: the symposium features our very own Sarah Koch, also, we have no math T-shirt pictures from UIC. Students who have completed an undergraduate mathematical research project are invited to apply to give a 20-minute presentation about your project.

The Simpsons visualize three dimensions,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

P.S. Math sponsors many, many clubs. The Michigan Finance and Mathematics Society (MFAMS), the Student Actuaries at Michigan (SAM), STEM Society, and the Women in Math (WIM) clubs all provide excellent opportunities to participate in the Michigan Mathematics community.

  • MFAMS. If you are interested in pursuing a career that uses financial mathematics both professionally and academically, the MFAMS may be for you.  Through information sessions, coffee chats, workshops, academic talks, and other events, the club seeks to establish and maintain meaningful relationships with recruiters and companies to support members' professional goals.
  • SAM. If applied math, insurance, or risk interests you, then consider joining the Student Actuaries at Michigan. Over 100 members (mostly actuarial science majors) benefit from the on-campus information sessions, actuarial exam subsidies, and professional networking events that SAM provides. In addition to their strengths in academic and professional development, the SAM Tree Owls frequently make IM sports finals.
  • STEM Society. STEM Society aims to expose K-12 students, especially in lower socioeconomic areas, to inquiry-based learning in the fields of science and math. They hope to disprove common stereotypes that students may have about science and math as well as to increase the students' awareness of the diverse opportunities available in these fields. In addition, STEM Society strives to provide undergraduates with an interest in teaching or sharing their passion for science and math with opportunities to do so. For more information, please contact them by e-mail at stemsocietyboard@umich.edu.
  • WIM. The Women in Mathematics club seeks to provide social and educational support for women studying mathematics and statistics. They provide opportunities to hear from female speakers in mathematics, allow members to meet others with similar academic interests, and provide peer support for classes and career options. WIM holds study nights, brings in speakers, and hold groups social events. If you have any questions, please e-mail women.in.math.board@umich.edu.
  • SUMS. The Society of Mathematics Students is an organization whose goal is to facilitate friendships and community amongst mathematics majors and those interested in mathematics.  It is also the undergraduate volunteer arm of Michigan's Math Circle, a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics. If you are interested in joining SUMS on Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 8 beginning September 22nd to help with Math Circle, please contact Stephen DeBacker.

 

 

 

22 September

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Wow! Y'all are a lucky bunch. After the passing of the Drop/Add deadline on Monday, there are at least two unusual and fantastic opportunities available to you next week:

  • The Math Department is partnering with Wolverine Pathways, this is a key program in the University's efforts to increase diversity. We will be running large numbers of Math Circles (if you are not familiar with them, here is a video about a Math Circle with which Michigan's Bob Megginson works) at both the Ypsilanti and Southfield sites this fall on Saturdays from 8AM to 1PM beginning October 1 and running through Thanksgiving. If you are interested in participating, please e-mail me (Stephen DeBacker) directly (smdbackr@umich.edu).
  • Author and freelance mathematician Jeff Weeks will deliver a public lecture on the Shape of Space next Wednesday (September 28) at 5:30 PM in 1324 East Hall. Professor Weeks is an excellent expositor, and discussing the topology of the universe with him is wildly good fun. I highly recommend that you attend; curiosity and imagination are the only prerequs.

Speaking of numbers and topology, at today's Math Club talk GilYoung Cheong will discuss Topological Methods for Some Arithmetic Problems. His talk occurs at 4:10 talk in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall). All are invited, and the food, drink, and math are free.

Below you will find more opportunities for Math Students. NOTE: this is just a listing of the opportunities that passed through my e-mail this week. A more permanent record of the many opportunities available to you is kept at Missive Central.

Careers.

  • Michigan Mathematics alumna Olivia Fenwick now works with United Airlines as an Associate Analyst in Revenue Management. She reports that United Airlines is currently hiring for Associate Analysts in Revenue Management and Pricing, and they will be on campus tonight, the 22nd, from 6pm – 7:30pm in R0240 in Ross. See their flier for more details about the job.
  • Michigan's Fall Career Expo will take place on Wednesday, September 28, and Thursday, September 29, from 10:30 to 3:30 pm in the Michigan Union. Last year more than half of the participating companies offered internships.
  • Michigan Mathematics alumna Cindy Wu work as a data scientist for Oracle and reports that Oracle is looking to hire data scientists to join their two-year Rotational Analyst (RA) Program. Oracle will be at the Fall Career Expo on September 29 and invite students of mathematics to The Oracle Data Cloud (ODC) Info Session at 5PM on the 30th in East Hall 1360 for (a free) meal and talk. RSVP here.
  • Michigan Mathematics alumna Diana Witowski is currently Associate CFO of the UM Health System, but she is also the director of the UMHS Finance Development Program that offers internships and full-time jobs. The program is hosting Networking Hours on Monday September 26th from noon to 4pm in Room 2105C of the Union. 
  • Michigan Mathematics alumnus Yuke Cui reports that his employer, American Airlines, is looking for math majors. He is going to be on campus next Tuesday the 27th and Wednesday the 28th to recruit undergrads into their Revenue Management and Finance programs. See their flier for details.
  • The NY Federal Reserve is now accepting applications for their Research Analyst position at www.newyorkfed.org/careers. It is recommended that candidates apply by October 15th.
  • A.T. Kearney’s Procurement and Analytic Solutions practice, which helps clients with network optimization, predictive modeling, spend analytics, process simulation, benchmarking, etc., will be on campus quite often in the coming weeks. They have full time career opportunities for students of mathematics. Please see this link for their events. They are looking for analysts and senior analysts.
  • Qualtrics will be on campus for the Fall Expo. Additionally, they invite students of mathematics to an information session that they are hosting with the Economics department from 3:30-4:30pm on Thursday, September 29th in 265 Lorch Hall.
  • Capital Markets Origination (Citibank) is looking to hire math majors. They will be hosting an event on Monday, September 26 from 4 to 5:30 in East Hall 1360; please see their flier for more details.
  • Fiat-Chrysler will be at the LSA Career Expo next week and is looking to fill multiple Intern and Full-time career opportunities. Additionally, they are hosting a Corporate Presentation & Networking event this upcoming Monday the 26th from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, at the Colloquium Conference Room (upstairs, Ross Business School).
  • Not on Handshake? Please do yourself a favor and sign up -- whether you are a first year or an nth year, y'all need to set up a Handshake account. Like penguins, careers for students of math often require us to look in unexpected places. The more math people who sign up, the more likely opportunities will get sent your (plural) way.
  • Are you enthusiastic about learning new concepts and passionate about the power of technology, interested in technology and wanting to build coding skills, and eligible to work full time in as of June 2017? Then apply to JPMorgan Chase's Tech Connect program.
  • Freshmen: Every Friday from noon to 1PM the Career Center hosts Freshman Friday at the Career Center. This is an excellent opportunity to meet your Career Center Advisors in an informal setting.
  • The Career Center hosts many immersion programs where you visit a company's workplace and experience a typical workday. These programs often take students to Grand Rapids, Chicago, etc. So, not only do immersions provide a good way to learn about careers, but they also provide an excellent opportunity to contribute to the math T-shirt photo page.
  • Eventually, the fun, halcyon college days come to an end for most of us. It is never too early to prepare for life after college. If you are going to ask a teacher for a letter of recommendation, please try to do it while the teacher has a chance of remembering not only who you are, but also how you performed in the class. Waiting until two or three years after the class is not a good option. Also, for the relatively low price of twenty-five dollars, the Career Center offers a Reference Letter Service. This service may also be used to streamline the graduate school (professional or otherwise) application process.

Opportunities:

  • Students of Mathematics have a very impressive track record when it comes to winning the Goldwater, Astronaut, and Churchill Scholarships. (If you are not impressed by the list, remember: Michigan has had only 14 Churchill's in its history and about 8 Astronaut Scholars.) If you have both a GPA above 3.9 and research experience, then you should seriously consider representing Michigan in these national competitions. If you are interested, please contact me pronto.
  • National scholarships that I've never heard about that might be for you: Thermo-Fisher Scientific Antibody Scholarship Program (recently won by a chemist with a math minor at Trinity University) and the NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program.
  • This year, the Putnam Competition is on Saturday, December 3rd and the Virginia Tech Math Competition is on Saturday, October 22nd. If you wish to participate in the Putnam competition, you MUST be signed up on the list by 5:00pm, Wednesday October 4th, with absolutely no exceptions. You can sign up for the VT competition until October 14th, but might as well put your name on both lists when you visit 2084 East Hall. Don't miss your chance!
  • The student organization Wolverine Tutors offers on-line tutoring to high school students across Michigan. If you are interested in volunteering as a tutor, please sign up here. Caveat: Make sure that you are part of the solution, and not part of the problem.
  • The Center for Education Outreach (located in the South U mall, second floor) runs the program Rising Scholars, which recruits math tutors for local high schools.   If you are interested, the contact person at CEO is Michael Turner (mlturner@umich.edu).  
  • The National Science Foundation has huge, absolutely enormous, graduate fellowships for seniors planning to continue on to graduate school (in many disciplines). Here's how to win one. Apply today -- deadlines fall in October, that is very soon.
  • Math Circle. Now in its seventh year, Math Circle is a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics; it will meet on Thursday nights from 6:30 to 8 beginning tonight (September 22nd). I hope that you will consider helping to run the circle by taking some time on Thursday evenings to work with the students in small groups. University Policy requires all Math Circle volunteers to undergo a background check. Please contact Stephen DeBacker for more information.
  • Your LSA Student Government invites you to apply to the Majors & Minors Council, a committee designed to address the concerns of students regarding the hundreds of majors and minors offered by the departments in the college. They meet every Thursday from 6-7pm, starting Thursday, September 29th. Please contact Hanna Simmons or Amanda Delekta if you have any questions. The interest form is due by 11:59PM on Wednesday the 28th.
  • Chris Swinko is a 3rd/4th-grade classroom teacher at Summers-Knoll in Ann Arbor. Inspired by the book On Looking - A Walker's Guide to the Art of Observation, he is inviting various experts to walk through the building and school grounds and asking them to observe and share their unique perspectives with the students. Poets, photographers, biologists, kindergarteners, ... have been asked to participate, and now Chris is looking for a mathematician. If you are interested please contact him.

T-shirt Photos:

  • I hope everyone had a pleasant summer and remembered to be photographed in their math T-shirt for me. Please visit the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? web page to catch up on some of the antics of your fellow math students, and you should send your photos to me. Math T-shirts are available for purchase (seven dollars; exact change only) in the Undergraduate Student Services Office located at East Hall 2084.
  • Looking to attend graduate school in the fields of engineering, mathematics, science, technology, or related disciplines? If so, you may wish to attend The Big Ten+ Graduate School Exposition to be held at Purdue University this weekend (September 25 and 26). I am looking forward to a contribution to the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? from exotic West Lafayette.

Summer:

Fighting monsters with topology,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

P.S. Math sponsors many, many clubs. The Michigan Finance and Mathematics Society (MFAMS), the Student Actuaries at Michigan (SAM), STEM Society, and the Women in Math (WIM) clubs all provide excellent opportunities to participate in the Michigan Mathematics community.

  • MFAMS. If you are interested in pursuing a career that uses financial mathematics both professionally and academically, the MFAMS may be for you.  Through information sessions, coffee chats, workshops, academic talks, and other events, the club seeks to establish and maintain meaningful relationships with recruiters and companies to support members' professional goals.
  • SAM. If applied math, insurance, or risk interests you, then consider joining the Student Actuaries at Michigan. Over 100 members (mostly actuarial science majors) benefit from the on-campus information sessions, actuarial exam subsidies, and professional networking events that SAM provides. In addition to their strengths in academic and professional development, the SAM Tree Owls frequently make IM sports finals.
  • STEM Society. STEM Society aims to expose K-12 students, especially in lower socioeconomic areas, to inquiry-based learning in the fields of science and math. They hope to disprove common stereotypes that students may have about science and math as well as to increase the students' awareness of the diverse opportunities available in these fields. In addition, STEM Society strives to provide undergraduates with an interest in teaching or sharing their passion for science and math with opportunities to do so. For more information, please contact them by e-mail at stemsocietyboard@umich.edu.
  • WIM. The Women in Mathematics club seeks to provide social and educational support for women studying mathematics and statistics. They provide opportunities to hear from female speakers in mathematics, allow members to meet others with similar academic interests, and provide peer support for classes and career options. WIM holds study nights, brings in speakers, and hold groups social events. If you have any questions, please e-mail women.in.math.board@umich.edu.
  • SUMS. The Society of Mathematics Students is an organization whose goal is to facilitate friendships and community amongst mathematics majors and those interested in mathematics.  It is also the undergraduate volunteer arm of Michigan's Math Circle, a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics. If you are interested in joining SUMS on Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 8 beginning September 22nd to help with Math Circle, please contact Stephen DeBacker.

 

 

15 September

Dear Students of Mathematics,

Long ago, before most of the people reading this missive were born, Eugene Wigner wrote a gem of an article entitled The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences. Over the years others have expanded upon Wigner's original thesis; see, for example, Richard Hamming's 1980 essay on The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics. At today's Math Club talk Martin J. Strauss will continue this conversation by looking at Applications of Finite Projective Planes (however, he will probably not consider this one). His talk occurs at 4:10 talk in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall). All are invited, and the food, drink, and math are free.

Keep reading and clicking. There is definitely something for everybody on this massive laundry list of opportunity, so read through to the end. A more permanent record of these opportunities is kept at Missive Central.

T-shirt Photos:

  • I hope everyone had a pleasant summer and remembered to be photographed in their math T-shirt for me. Please visit the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? web page to catch up on some of the antics of your fellow math students, and you should send your photos to me. Math T-shirts are available for purchase (seven dollars; exact change only) in the Undergraduate Student Services Office located at East Hall 2084.
  • We still have no Math T-shirt pictures from the extremely popular Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics. Applications for the 2017 Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics will be taken on-line between October 4 and October 11, 2016. (By the way, Michigan Math alumna Judy Walker founded this conference 19 years ago.)
  • The 4th Annual Midwest Actuarial Student Conference (MASC) will take place in Chicago October 21 to 22. Note: we have no Math T-shirt photos from any of the DePaul campuses.
  • AIESEC has many wonderful math T-shirt photo opportunities. Through AIESEC you can do (paid) intern work in financial mathematics, business analysis, education, and many others fields in over 100 countries.
  • Are you a senior? The Cambridge Centre for Analysis (the CCA) is looking for applicants to their PhD program. The CCA says: "Overseas applicants seeking scholarships should apply by 12 October 2016 (US Gates applicants) or 7 December 2016 (other overseas / EU applicants). Please refer to the Cambridge Graduate Admissions website for further information."
  • OK, this has nothing to do with math, but it has been a few years since we've had a math photo from Iceland. There is an LSA internship opportunity at Wilma's Wish Productions, assisting in production of a documentary film on Iceland's constitutional reform movement. Travel to Iceland available (all travel expenses reimbursed). Application materials are here.

Summer:

Careers.

  • Michigan Math alumna Jessica Bertolina reports that her company, Jeffries, will be on campus September 30 for an an internship presentation.  Jefferies is a global investment bank with internship opportunities in both Sales & Trading and Investment Banking.  The presentation will be held at Ross, but LSA students are welcome to apply.  Please contact Jessica Bertolina with any questions you may have.
  • Michigan Math alumnus Jacob Light currently works as a research analyst with The Brattle Group, an economic consulting firm. He reports that based on his "deep belief that Michigan students- particularly Michigan Math students- are the leaders and best, I wanted to reach out and pass along some information about our upcoming application deadline. We will be conducting on-campus interviews at Michigan on Monday, October 10 (application deadline September 25, available through the Career Center), so I wanted to pass along our job listing for students who may be interested in applying.  I believe that Michigan math students' capacity for solving complex problems and ability to think critically serves them well in the RA role at Brattle." More information is here.
  • Michigan Math alumna Cindy Wu reports that Oracle is looking to hire in their Rotational (Data) Analyst program. Additionally, they will be hosting and information session on September 30 at 5PM in EH 1360 to which you are to bring a hard copy of your resume for an on-the-spot review of your background. RSVP at  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/KMV3LRG.
  • The University of Michigan's Department of Biostatistics invites you to attend their Prospective Student Information Day on Saturday, October 15, 2016. The event is an opportunity for students who may be interested in graduate study in Biostatistics to learn about UofM's program and to meet the faculty.
  • Mutual of Omaha has many positions they are looking to fulfill, including positions in Valuation (# 027986), Enterprise Risk Management (# 028018), Group Pricing (# 027727), and various Actuary Student Programs (# 027606), and various internships (028344).
  • If you are graduating before the summer of 2018, then you may want to look into this internship with the Global Data, Insight and Analytics division at Ford.
  • The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is recruiting this fall for the Director’s Financial Analyst position, and they want Math students to apply. This unique, two-year rotational fellowship, which will begin during the summer of 2017, sits at the intersection of the federal government and the financial services industry.  Students can apply for the program here between September 16 and September 20. The CFPB will also be on campus September 28, 2016 from 10:30am – 3:30pm for the Fall Career Expo Day. Additionally, a second application window will be open from October 13 to October 17. Please contact Julianna St. Onge with any questions you may have.
  • Nielsen is coming to campus on 9/27 and 9/28. They are the world's leading market and media research company, and they are looking to hire in Data Science, Human Resources, Operations, and Professional Services. Please see their flier.
  • Google! Are you interested in learning more about Google's unique culture and opportunities? Curious about the variety of impactful projects happening in our offices across North America? Then join Google for one or both of the following on-campus events: 
    • Fall Engineering Career Fair. Bring your curiosity and stop by the Google table to speak to Michigan alums about current open opportunities, how to make your resume stand out and Google's interview process. Join them at the Engineering Buildings on Monday, September 19 from 10am to 4pm.
    • Google Career Panel. Interested in learning more about internships and Full Time jobs at Google? Well, here is your chance! Join Google for a career panel discussion with 4 Michigan alums. Come hear them share their path to Google, talk about their projects, how to prepare for interviews, and anything else you want to know about life as a Googler. Be sure to bring your questions and Google will bring bring the food and swag.  Join Google at 1670 BBB on Wednesday, September 21 from 6:30pm to 8:00pm.
    Be sure to RSVP here: http://goo.gl/v24FCo. Feel free to reach out to michstudents@google.com for more information.
  • MATCH Teacher Residency offers the opportunity to spend one year in Boston working with middle and high school children. You may select between full time tutoring, or tutoring with teacher training. They are reviewing applications on a rolling basis from September until June.
  • Deutsche Bank asks that I let you know about their Analyst Internship Program -- a paid ten week program. They say that you should be able to find it from here, but their web-page is still not working very well for me.
  • Teach for America (more general than Math for America, but needs math teachers) has rolling monthly deadlines (beginning in August) that end in February.
  • The Society of Women Engineers hosts corporate information sessions throughout the year; if there is a company you'd like to talk to, be sure to head up north and check the company out. 
  • Eventually, the fun, halcyon college days come to an end for most of us. It is never too early to prepare for life after college. If you are going to ask a teacher for a letter of recommendation, please try to do it while the teacher has a chance of remembering not only who you are, but also how you performed in the class. Waiting until two or three years after the class is not a good option. Also, for the relatively low price of twenty-five dollars, the Career Center offers a Reference Letter Service. This service may also be used to streamline the graduate school (professional or otherwise) application process.

Much more:

  • Michigan Math alumna Sophia Kaplan reports that "one of my favorite things I did in Ann Arbor was tutor math at Peace Neighborhood Center, and so I am passing this opportunity along and highly recommending it to all math undergrads. Not only will you help a local high school student succeed academically, you will also get to know your tutee on a personal level and form a real relationship with them. Please put your amazing math talents to a good and important use and consider volunteering at Peace - it is something well worth making time for!"
  • Michigan Interactive Investments (MII), a Michigan undergraduate student-run investment club, is looking for math majors interested in finance to apply. MII has a stellar recruiting record. Many of their members have gone to intern and work at Apollo Global Management, The Blackstone Group, Bridgewater Associates, Centerview Partners, Intergroup, Evermore, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and RBC Capital Markets. Applications are due Friday 11:59 PM on-line at miiclub.org. Please contact current Student of Mathematics Yuan Chen if you have any questions.
  • Do you love to program? Looking for a challenge, camaraderie, and fun? Look no further: The UM Computer Programming Team wants you! Join the UM team as they train for the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest -- regionals are October 29. Contact Professor Kevin Compton for more information.
  • If you would like to practice your English skills, then consider joining one of the English Language Institutes Conversation Circles. Students may sign up at any time throughout the year.
  • Demonstrate you data science prowess at MinneMUDAC. This data science competition will happen Saturday, Nov. 5 from 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. at Optum in Eden Prairie, MN. Find out more here.
  • How many of you remember Marlin Perkins? He was awesome. His sponsor, Mutual of Omaha, is offering a Minority Actuarial Scholarship and Internship, applications are due October 20, 2016.
  • If you are in the Honors Program and looking for a bit of money to help cover research expenses (including travel!), you may want to look at this Honors Programs Scholarship Page.
  • The National Science Foundation has huge, absolutely enormous, graduate fellowships for seniors planning to continue on to graduate school (in many disciplines). Here's how to win one. Apply today -- deadlines fall in October, that is very soon.
  • Math Circle. Now in its seventh year, Math Circle is a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics; it will meet on Thursday nights from 6:30 to 8 beginning September 22nd. I hope that you will consider helping to run the circle by taking some time on Thursday evenings to work with the students in small groups. University Policy requires all Math Circle volunteers to undergo a background check. Please contact Stephen DeBacker for more information.
  • The Science, Mathematics, And Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship-for-Service Program fully funds undergraduate and graduate degrees in a wide range of technical areas, including all fields of Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and Mathematics. Applications accepted until December 1.
  • Remember the magic of your Campus Day visit? Be a part of the magic for members of the class of 2021 by serving as a Campus Day tour guide. Applications are usually due early in the Fall term.

Math being unreasonably effective,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

P.S. Math sponsors many, many clubs. The Michigan Finance and Mathematics Society (MFAMS), the Student Actuaries at Michigan (SAM), STEM Society, and the Women in Math (WIM) clubs all provide excellent opportunities to participate in the Michigan Mathematics community.

  • MFAMS. If you are interested in pursuing a career that uses financial mathematics both professionally and academically, the MFAMS may be for you.  Through information sessions, coffee chats, workshops, academic talks, and other events, the club seeks to establish and maintain meaningful relationships with recruiters and companies to support members' professional goals.
  • SAM. If applied math, insurance, or risk interests you, then consider joining the Student Actuaries at Michigan. Over 100 members (mostly actuarial science majors) benefit from the on-campus information sessions, actuarial exam subsidies, and professional networking events that SAM provides. In addition to their strengths in academic and professional development, the SAM Tree Owls frequently make IM sports finals.
  • STEM Society. STEM Society aims to expose K-12 students, especially in lower socioeconomic areas, to inquiry-based learning in the fields of science and math. They hope to disprove common stereotypes that students may have about science and math as well as to increase the students' awareness of the diverse opportunities available in these fields. In addition, STEM Society strives to provide undergraduates with an interest in teaching or sharing their passion for science and math with opportunities to do so. For more information, please contact them by e-mail at stemsocietyboard@umich.edu.
  • WIM. The Women in Mathematics club seeks to provide social and educational support for women studying mathematics and statistics. They provide opportunities to hear from female speakers in mathematics, allow members to meet others with similar academic interests, and provide peer support for classes and career options. WIM holds study nights, brings in speakers, and hold groups social events. If you have any questions, please e-mail women.in.math.board@umich.edu.
  • SUMS. The Society of Mathematics Students is an organization whose goal is to facilitate friendships and community amongst mathematics majors and those interested in mathematics.  It is also the undergraduate volunteer arm of Michigan's Math Circle, a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics. If you are interested in joining SUMS on Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 8 beginning September 22nd to help with Math Circle, please contact Stephen DeBacker.

 

 

 

8 September

Dear Students of Mathematics,

If you are like me, then you are wistfully wishing that the fraction of the year we call summer could continue a bit longer. To help smooth your transition back into academia (and continue the discussion of fractions and continuity) be sure to attend today's Math Club talk which features Anton Lukyanenko speaking on The Geometry of Continued Fractions. His talk occurs at 4:10 talk in the Nesbitt Common Room (2nd floor of East Hall). All are invited, and the food, drink, and math are free.

Like you, I am very busy this week. So, I only tell you the things that you need to know about NOW:

 

Clubs. The Michigan Finance and Mathematics Society (MFAMS), the Student Actuaries at Michigan (SAM), STEM Society, and the Women in Math (WIM) clubs are also kicking off the semester in fine style:

  • MFAMS. If you are interested in pursuing a career that uses financial mathematics both professionally and academically, the MFAMS may be for you.  Through information sessions, coffee chats, workshops, academic talks, and other events, the club seeks to establish and maintain meaningful relationships with recruiters and companies to support members' professional goals. Their first mass meeting will be Tuesday, September 13 at 6:30 pm, location TBD (look for posters around East Hall).
  • SAM. If applied math, insurance, or risk interests you, then consider joining the Student Actuaries at Michigan. Over 100 members (mostly actuarial science majors) benefit from the on-campus information sessions, actuarial exam subsidies, and professional networking events that SAM provides. In addition to their strengths in academic and professional development, the SAM Tree Owls frequently make IM sports finals. Their first mass meeting is TODAY, Thursday, September 8th, at 5:00 pm in MH 1427. and the second is Monday, September 12th, at 5:00 pm in EH 1360. Come learn more about actuarial science, the companies that recruit here, SAM's social events, their intramural prowess, and more! Also meet SAM's fabulous board.
  • STEM Society. STEM Society aims to expose K-12 students, especially in lower socioeconomic areas, to inquiry-based learning in the fields of science and math. They hope to disprove common stereotypes that students may have about science and math as well as to increase the students' awareness of the diverse opportunities available in these fields. In addition, STEM Society strives to provide undergraduates with an interest in teaching or sharing their passion for science and math with opportunities to do so. Please join them for a mass meeting on Wednesday, September 14th at 5:00 pm in the Tap Room of the Union to learn more. For more information, please contact them by e-mail at stemsocietyboard@umich.edu.
  • WIM. The Women in Mathematics club seeks to provide social and educational support for women studying mathematics and statistics. They provide opportunities to hear from female speakers in mathematics, allow members to meet others with similar academic interests, and provide peer support for classes and career options. WIM holds study nights, brings in speakers, and hold groups social events. Please join them for a mass meeting on  Wednesday, September 14th at 6:30pm, location TBD (look for posters around East Hall). If you have any questions, please e-mail women.in.math.board@umich.edu.
  • SUMS. The Society of Mathematics Students is an organization whose goal is to facilitate friendships and community amongst mathematics majors and those interested in mathematics.  It is also the undergraduate volunteer arm of Michigan's Math Circle, a program for high school and middle school kids who live and breathe mathematics. If you are interested in joining SUMS on Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 8 beginning September 22nd to help with Math Circle, please contact Stephen DeBacker.

Time sensitive opportunities.

  • The Michigan Data Science Team (MDST) is an interdisciplinary student organization open to undergraduate and graduate students interested in learning data science skills and applying them to real-world problems. The team works on projects ranging from the Flint Water Crisis to Kaggle competitions, using machine learning and other tools to analyze data. Weekly tutorials are presented, and pizza is provided! Check out the team at mdst.eecs.umich.edu, or attend tonight's (Thursday September 8th) info session at 6PM in 1670 BBB.  
  • Many undergraduates enjoy attending the Budapest Semesters in Mathematics; the deadline for the spring term is September 15. Visit the BSM MCompass page to learn more. Mathematics student Amanda B. participated in the Budapest program last year and "highly recommends BSM for any math student with a sense of adventure."
  • There are many internship opportunities at the National Security Agency. Applications are due from September 1 to October 31. This includes The Director's Summer Program.

I hope your first day of class was this entertaining,

--Stephen

Stephen DeBacker
Undergraduate Program Director
mathematics-upd@umich.edu

 

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/missive

 

P.S. To help preserve your summer memories be sure to send in your Math T-shirt photos for the Where Has Your Math T-shirt Been? web page. Math T-shirts are available for purchase (seven dollars; exact change only) in the Undergraduate Student Services Office located at East Hall 2084.