Marjorie Lee Browne Colloquium

The Marjorie Lee Browne Colloquium was established in 1999 in the Department of Mathematics in observance of Martin Luther King day. The colloquium brings a distinguished speaker to campus to present a talk that highlights their research but also addresses the issue of diversity in the sciences. It honors the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in Mathematics from UM.

Marjorie Lee Browne received her B.S. in mathematics from Howard University (1935). She received her M.S. in mathematics from the University of Michigan in 1939, making her one of the first few African American women with a graduate mathematics degree. Ms. Browne taught at Wiley College while continuing graduate work during the summers. She received a Ph.D. in mathematics from Michigan in 1950, making her Michigan’s first known African-American woman mathematics Ph.D. recipient. Her thesis, “On the One Parameter Subgroups of Certain Topological and Matrix Groups”, was directed by Professor G. Y. Rainich.

Dr. Browne taught at North Carolina Central University from 1949 until her death in 1979. She was the only faculty member with a Ph.D. for twenty five years, and a strong leader. She chaired the department from 1951 until 1970, supervised ten Masters theses, and inspired a generation of talented students to continue in mathematics. Dr. Browne also had a deep interest in continuing education for secondary school teachers. Under her leadership, the NSF funded a summer institute for secondary school teachers of mathematics for thirteen years, for which Dr. Browne also authored four sets of lecture notes.

Source: Patricia C. Kenschaft “Black Women in Mathematics in the United States,” American Mathematical Monthly, vol. 88 (1981), 592-604.

2014 Marjorie Lee Browne Colloquium Trachette Jackson, UM

Previous Speakers
2013 Richard A. Tapia, Rice University
2012 James Curry, University of Colorado
2011 Ivelisse Rubio, University of Puerto Rico
2010 Rodrigo Banuelos, Purdue University
2009 Emery Brown, MIT
2008 Juan Mesa, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
2007 William Massey, Princeton University
2006 Philip Kutzko, University of Iowa
2005 Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Arizona State University
2004 Arlie O. Petters, Duke University
2003 William Yslas Vélez, University of Arizona
2002 Raymond L. Johnson, University of Maryland
2001 Evelyn Boyd Granville, California State University, Los Angeles
2000 Sylvia Bozeman, Spelman College
1999 Robert Megginson, UM (prior to naming of the colloquium)